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20130201
20130228
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holders and record breakers. it's oscars by the numbers. >> announcer: ke >> announcer: from new york city, this is "nightline" with bill weir. >>> today brought a cliffhanger moment in a murder trial full of twists and turns. jodi arias, the arizona woman facing death row for shooting, stabbing and slashing her one time boyfriend. tearfully told the court she acted in self defense and she can't remember everything that happened that fateful night. here is abc's ryan owens for our series "crime and punishment." >> the gun went off. i didn't mean to shoot him or anything i didn't even think i was holding the trigger. >> reporter: from the mouth of a killer. today the jury heard jodi arias' version of what happened the day she took these pictures of her ex-boyfriend travis alexander in the shower. >> i am taking pictures of him. weep were trying out different poses. it was a little weird the background wasn't that great, the water was okay. >> reporter: and second later, butchered the mormon businessman in the bathroom of his mesa home. she dropped alexander's camera. he flew into a rage. >>
to be swift, heavy and dangerous. >> stay off the streets of our city. basically, stay home. >> reporter: the storm already struck the midwest, blanketing chicago with snow and leaving cars in ditches in wisconsin. along the densely i-95 corridor from new york, boston and beyond, preparations are under way. crews across the region loaded up salt trucks and are ready to hit the road. >> it will probably be a long four days, which is tough on anybody. >> reporter: no doubt, there is a lot of work ahead. new york has 6,300 miles of streets to plow. >> we have more than 250,000 tons of salt on-hand. >> reporter: in new jersey, residents brace for the storm, even though they haven't recovered from the devastation left behind by superstorm sandy. >> trying to batten down the hatches here, if any storms are coming. the last one ruined us totally. >> reporter: new england residents rushed out to stock up on essentials. >> this is panic shopping. so, bread, milk, a snow shovel in case our snow shovel breaks. >> reporter: the fire department was even called into a supermarket in salem, massachuset
with news out of the city. former new york city mayor ed koch has died. he was the face of the city in the '80s. known worldwide for a feisty style and for helping to rescue new york from near financial ruin. he died this morning. he was 88 years old. >>> we turn now to the price of gas, about to set a record for this time of the year. numbers out this morning have shown that prices have risen 13 cents in the last two weeks. the national average, $3.46 per gallon. you can blame a slowdown at refineries and the rising cost of crude oil. >>> and we're getting our first major read how the economy is faring thus far. 157,000 jobs were created. fewer than the economists had expected. the unemployment ticked up slightly. raising from 7.8% to 7.9%. >>> and a $30,000 reward is now being offered following the brazen murder of an assistant district attorney near dallas. mark hasse was ambushed by a masked gunman, shot five times while walking into court. investigators believe he may have been targeted for investigating the aryan brotherhood. >>> we have a developing story south of the border.
explosion and fast-moving flames race through a popular kansas city district full of shops and restaurants. >> what investigators are finding this morning after a fire that burned for hours. it's wednesday, february 20th. >>> from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> and i'm diana perez. we'll get to the kansas city fire investigation in just a moment in our top story. >>> also this morning, the costly computer crimes costing the american economy hundreds of billions of dollars a year. the fingers are pointing at china, as the white house announces plans to fight the hackers. >>> and this is crazy. why hand sanitizer is being singled out in a fire that severely burned an 11-year-old girl. wait until you hear how something so common turned into something so hazardous. you think you're doing the right thing, killing the germs, all the dirt in our workplace and homes and something like that happens. that story is crazy. >> and where it happened is also crazy. >>> and later on, clyde davis, his tell-all book, his big secrets, and a singing star wh
in a century. the warnings could not be clearer. >> stay off the streets of our city. basically, stay home. >> reporter: a snowstorm that hit the great lakes with snow and ice is joining another storm in the south to form a monster nor'easter. as many as 23 million people are in the path. some coastal areas hit by hurricane sandy are in the bull's-eye of a prolonged storm. some of sandy's survivors still living in tents on new york's staten island will have to move. floods threaten the northeast shoreline for thousands of miles. it's a dreaded sense of deja vu. along the new jersey shore. >> i think i'm going to have to move my things upstairs and see what happens. >> in case it floods? yeah. >> reporter: salt truck and plow operators from pennsylvania to maine are ready for a long haul. >> it will probably be a long four days. you know? which is tough on anybody. >> reporter: fears of power outages sent people to the supermarkets to stock up. sales of generators are brisk, and travelers have been changing plans, rebooking flights to avoid agonizing airline delays. >> they relaxed their po
bashar assad, becomes a city under siege. it is a dirty war, in a crucial country. just look at the map. the chaos engulfing syria threatens to spill over into iraq on one side, israel and lebanon on the other. a nightmare scenario for the u.s. the united nations now estimates that 70,000 people have been killed in the fighting, though no one really knows. a u.n. commission today called for war crimes investigations of both sides. assad's government, which has sought to crush the rebellion by any means necessary. and the rebels, many of whom are increasingly seen by ordinary syrians as war lords, gangsters and religious fanatics who regularly post videos of beheadings and other atrocities on youtube. damascus is quiet tonight. some light traffic. no one really walking around. 5 million people hunkered down, as the terrible war that is tearing their country apart has now arrived here, in fierce battles raging in the city's suburbs. syria's many minorities live in terror of a jihadist takeover of their country. before we came here, we visited christian refugees from syria who had fled to
, the stronghold of the government of president bashar assad, becomes a city under siege. it is a dirty war, in a crucial country. just look at the map. the chaos engulfing syria threatens to spill over into iraq on one side, israel and lebanon on the other. a nightmare scenario for the u.s. the united nations now estimates that 70,000 people have been killed in the fighting. though, no one really knows. damascus is quiet. some light traffic. no one really walking around. 5 million people hunkered down, as the terrible war that is tearing their country apart has now arrived here, in fierce battles raging in the city's suburbs. >> that's terry moran for us in damascus. terry is in syria, with permission from the government there. he'll be reporting on the conflict throughout the week. >>> one more note from overseas. we learned overnight who is likely responsible for recent internet attacks on the u.s. government and businesses. a security firm tells "the new york times" it can tie those attacks to the chinese army. the company has traced the attacks to a building in shanghai used by an army
expected west of kansas city by late thursday. now the nation's heartland preparing for what could be the worst storm to hit the midwest since the groundhog day blizzard in 2011. the snow may not be the only problem, and diane, it may not be the biggest problem. take a look at this storm system, when it finally gets together. what you're seeing on the ray door tonight is not even the real storm. the storm really kicks in tomorrow, getting all its energy. it has a layer of measurable ice and that's basically, already ice storm warnings out for northern arkansas and southern missouri. that's miserable ice, we think. and this line of severe storms from new orleans, including texas, all the way to mississippi. those storms could have tornadoes in them. we could be reporting on all of it during the day tomorrow. just something everyone should look for. >> not a little bit of everything, it's a lot of everything heading their way. >> reporter: a lot. >> thank you so much, sam. good to see you tonight. >>> and now, we head off to south africa and the big twist today in the case against ol
in the classroom with his pilot program called science genius. now launching in ten high schools in new york city. the goal of the experiment, improving student's science grades. >> the idea here is to take what they're looking for already, combine that with their culture, and introduce them to science, which is something that they're inherently good at and open up with possibilities. >> reporter: those possibilities expanding with the help of a celebrity partner. both were met with some skepticism and uncertainty from students. >> it clicked to me. because science and hip-hop combined, how does that work? >> reporter: well, it works with a regular lesson plan followed by a challenge like this. >> one bar based on one science topic. >> reporter: once a week. getting their first assignment, the students here at urban assembly class were on it. ♪ >> reporter: two unlikely elements fusing to create a new formula for success. >> i think it will inspire them to -- to focus on the details. >> it's going to be definitely easier for me to stay on top of my class. >> reporter: they hope to expand this p
different countries and cities around the world. all you have to do is go up to the atm and there's a simple message on the screen. it says get 100 euros or the equivalent of $130 without a card. it says you can get $131 but there's a catch, you have to share it. so it will respond. if you say do you want the money, you say yes, but only if you agree to share it. it says do you need any suggestions where you want to give your money to? you can hire a store retailer for the kids in your neighborhood, buy diapers for a pregnant woman. then the atm gives you the cash, free money. no obligation to actually do what you just agreed to do. but the good news is that there are people who actually went out and did it. the majority of the people who grabbed the money from the atm shared it with their fellow man. so there are good people in the world. >> this is in america or overseas? >> it's overseas. it hasn't happened in america yet. let's see if americans are as kind. free money goes right into the pocket. >> there are angels everywhere. this is a cool story, too. there's this guy, a dutch entrepre
at stake and both cities have something to offer. so we have a few possibilities right here. >> as i talk about it how about you munch on it. we have sourdough bread, not chicken, sourdough bread. thank you, we have the sourdough bread from san francisco. the most famous, sourdough bread in the u.s. a form of french bread uses bacteria instead of yeast. maybe not the most appetizing detail. it is interesting. and been in continuous production since 1849. not so famous as in san francisco, ghirardelli chocolate, found in 1862 by delmonico, ghirardelli, second oldest chocolate in the u.s., baker's chocolate. 1893. ghirardelli square in san francisco. >> delicious actually. >> very good. >> baltimore. a place where i lived. the mayor of baltimore's disclaimer, a good friend of mine, stephanie rollins blake, and crab cakes are the big thing there. associated with the chesapeake bay, maryland and baltimore. crab cakes are great. the boardwalk crab cakes, breaded, deep fried and filled with stuffing of various things served on a bun. now the restaurant, aka, gourmet crab cakes prepared with no
of president assad, becomes a city under siege. it is a dirty war, in a crucial country. just look at the map. the chaos engulfing syria threatens to spill over into iraq on one time, israel and lebanon on the other. a nightmare scenario for the u.s. the united nations now estimates that 70,000 people have been killed in the fighting, though no one really knows. a u.n. commission called for war crimes investigations of both sides. assad's government, which has sought to crush the rebellion, and the rebels, who are seen as warlords, gangsters, and religious fanatics who regularly post videos of beheadings and other atrocities on youtube. damascus is quiet. no one really walking around. 5 million people hunkered down as the terrible war that's tearing their country apart has arrived here. in fierce battles raging in the city's suburbs. syria's many minorities live in terror of jihadist takeover of their country. before we came here, we visited christian refugees from syria who fled to beirut. they said they were forced out of their villages by muslim fundamentalists, ethnically cleansed. they s
. above ground, a bustling city of 12 million. [ horn honking ] below ground, we discover a gleaming subway system, far quieter and cleaner than the subways of new york city. and there was something else very different. this says women only here. the back of the train reserved for women. beyond the trains, the traffic, everywhere you look there's something else on the move, the prices. skyrocketing inflation. their currency losing 80% of its value in just the last year. u.s.-led sanctions tying an economic noose around iran. >> i think it hurts the people. >> reporter: the iranian people. >> plus, i think, the normal people. >> reporter: the relationship between the u.s. and iran never recovered after those 444 days. americans held hostage as the world watched. right here in the heart of downtown tehran, what used to be the u.s. embassy of course, the infamous backdrop to the hostage crisis that began unfolding in '79, you can see the gates are still here, still closed decades later. and behind us here what used to be the seal. you can still faintly make out "united states of america
the presidential palace. terry? >> reporter: diane, life in this city under siege is surreal. it's traffic jams and business deals still getting done while artillery fire and bombing raids punctuate the air. everything covered in a blanket of dread. people here in downtown damascus, they're still trying to carry on. but the war stalks them, edging ever closer. this evening, smoke billowed from a strike on the outskirts of the downtown. the suburbs are the battleground -- for now. so, this is the first one? earlier, at a hospital in the christian quarter of town, we were shown some light damage from a couple of primitive mortars fired by rebels. it's another stop on this trip where we have been granted visas by the government of president bashar assad to tell their side of the story in this brutal civil war. as we talked to witnesses -- and you hear this boom, boom, boom, all the time? they hardly notice anymore. but it takes its toll. they all know it could be so much worse. in the damascus suburb of daraya, government air strikes have reduced much of the place to rubble. as they have in the no
heard other explosions. this is a city where the war is closing in. in some ways, damascus is becoming more like baghdad. we hear from the residents, the point of this is to terrorize them, to get them to come to their knees. but the spirit in the face of something like this is defiance. another day of death in damascus. josh? >> terry, thank you. and please, be safe. terry will be bringing us reports throughout the morning as developments warrant. he'll also have reports on tonight's "world news" and later on "nightline." >>> breaking news from the heart of the las vegas strip. at least three people have been killed there after what's being called a rolling shootout between people in two cars. not far away from bellagio hotel and casino. >>> and newly-released video shows the moment that gas explosion tore through a kansas city restaurant and shopping complex on tuesday. one body has been found. but there are fears that at least one more victim remains buried in the rubble. a construction crew apparently struck a gas line, setting off the blast. >>> and lance armstrong, now, backing o
-watched city in the world. >> that's right. >> we did suicide missions in the army that had better odds than this. >> 100% he's there. okay, fine, 95%. because i know certainty freaks you guys out. but it's 100. >> lot of politics up for best picture this year. we'll talk about that in a little bit. >>> here with our second roundtable. joined by george will again. abc news contributor donna brazile. steven brill. author of a new "time" cover story. "why medical bills are killing us" is the title. steven rattner. and kimberley strassel. i want to start talking about this sequester, it is hitting on friday. the public doesn't seem to mind all that much. a pew poll out this week, about 49% of the public say they want to delay the cuts. but 40% say let them go in effect. most of the blame seems to be heading towards the gop. 49% say they should bare the blame for this. only 30% for president obama. kim, you argued in the wall street journal this week, republicans are in a strong political position, you say that the sequester isn't some gop fallback position, it's a proactive strategy. their way
mcmillen was running for office in clarksdale. a city known for its blues music. detectives have someone in custody but no charges have been filed. police have been looking for mcmillen since tuesday. that's when someone crashed his car and he was nowhere to be found. >>> the judge in the bp trial heard from former chief executive tony hayward, the man at the helm of the company during that oil spill in 2010. hayward, who famously said "i would like my life back" during the very height of the disaster was not present in that courtroom. instead, prosecutors played part of his deposition video. talking about the role of leaders being important to shaping the culture of a company. >>> with that, we take a look at weather on this thursday. several places get light snow today. but nothing like the blizzard earlier this week. showers meanwhile in florida. drying out elsewhere in the southeast. and of course, no shocker here, another beautiful, sunny day in honolulu. >> it's 81 degrees there. 69 in phoenix. you want to enjoy that. 50s for most of the east coast. not bad. 30s for the gre
one of the biggest natural gas projects in the world. enough power for a city the size of singapore for 50 years. what's it going to do to the planet? natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel there is. we've got to be smart about this. it's a smart way to go. ♪ >>> more roundtable coming up. but first stephen colbert, his sister is running for congress. it's for real. >> quick advice for any of you republicans out there who might end up with a debate with my big sister. this is how i used to win a lot of arguements with her when i was a kid. right after she maybes a good point, repeat it back to her in a dumb voice like this. ooh, social security is a public trust to those who paid into it for their entire working lives. ooh, stop, stop copying me, stephen, i'm telling mom. [ laughter ] >> trust me, it works. hter ] >> trust me, it works. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, fa
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18